How to Self-Correct Your Worries - by Savannah Slone

We all worry. Life can be stressful and, even when it’s not, our minds still ponder the possibilities. When you catch yourself doing this, ask yourself if you can control the situation. If you don’t have the power to change the outcome, do your best to let it go. As Newt Scamander said in Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, “Worrying means you suffer twice.” Thank you for that one, J.K. Rowling.

Your worrying is not benefitting you in any way. It’s only causing you stress and making your life harder than it would be if you accepted that you can’t control what will happen and live in the present. Be more aware of your thoughts, notice when you’re slipping up, and give yourself permission to stop worrying. The universe has a way of working itself out, so just trust that whatever comes of any given situation is meant to happen and you will adapt and get through it.

When you’re worrying, think back on other times that you have felt this way in the past. As you reflect, can you see how overthinking was a waste of your valuable time, in most instances? Not everything that we manifest in our heads, as possible outcomes for situations, will happen. As a matter of fact, most of what I worry about has never happened and probably will never happen. If you’ve read The Secret, then you are familiar with the idea of putting out into the world what you desire. So, instead of thinking, “I really don’t want to fail this quiz,” self-correct yourself by saying, “I’m so glad that I’m going to do well on this quiz.” Be sure and study, too, in this scenario, but this just goes to say that a positive outlook makes a difference in how your life goes. What you think, you attract.

Spend time outside, read, get a new hobby, exercise—keep up with the news and gain new perspective for some of your smaller scale worries. Keeping yourself busy when you’re starting to worry about things makes all the difference. Reflect on what you’re grateful for and focus on that instead.

With all of this being said, sometimes our worrying needs go beyond these helpful tips. Anxiety disorders are common. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, anxiety disorders affect 18.1 percent of adults in the United States. Below are a handful of symptoms that are often present in those diagnosed with anxiety disorders.

Excessive worry

Irrational fears

Panic attacks

Difficulty making decisions

Muscle tension


Trouble sleeping

Headaches

Restlessness

This is not to encourage a self-diagnosis, but rather to educate on what signs might be relevant to your life. Reach out to your doctor for a referral, if you think that you need to receive treatment with the aid of a mental health professional. May is Mental Health Awareness Month, so take time to learn more about anxiety disorders and other mental health conditions.

For those whose aren’t concerned that their worrying is a sign of an anxiety disorder, know that with self-awareness and intention, you can lead a calmer, more present life. Share your experience with trying to cut ties with your worrying with your friends and loved ones and it just might inspire them to follow suit.

Five Tips on Becoming a More Patient Parent- By Savannah Slone

If you are a parent, then you are most likely familiar with how difficult it can be to remain patient in trying times. Sometimes our children encounter the natural struggles that come with life, so we should aim to do our best to offer our greatest selves to them, as support systems and guides. Below are five tips to become a more patient parent.

1. It’s all about perspective.

In those unfortunate, yet human, instances when we lose patience with our kiddos, we have to become more self-aware, take a step back and empathize with them. In the moment, recognize and embrace your impatience. Try to understand what about this moment affected you; perhaps you’re exhausted, hungry, busy, or just not in the right headspace. Label your emotions, as well as your child’s and open up a conversation. Involve them in discussing the situation at hand, rather than making it a one-sided talk. Be your child’s guide, instead of solely their persecutor. Talking with your child, as opposed to talking at them, displays inclusivity and models appropriate verbal problem-solving skills. The main goal here is to put yourself in your child’s shoes and create teachable moments. Not only will your increased awareness teach you more about yourself, but you’ll also be setting an example for your little one.

2. Don’t take it personally.

We can’t expect kids to deal with what life throws at them like adults do. It takes a good chunk of our lifetimes of practice and experience before we have the emotional intelligence to cope. Observe your child with intention and uncover their triggers. Planning ahead with those in mind can save you both a lot of trouble. Giving verbal cues and talking things out can make a world of difference in preventing misunderstandings and meltdowns. However, no matter how much we work on articulating our feelings and avoiding patience testing times, they’ll still come up here and there. Just know that your children are responding to life as it comes to them and are doing their best. They aren’t acting out to punish you or push your buttons—there are underlying reasons. Do your best by keeping their perspective in mind and try not to take it personally.

3. Be a role model.

When you’re empathizing with your child, notice how you typically react and how that might affect them. While reflecting on your actions and behavior patterns, ask yourself if that is how you would want your child to react if they were in a similar position with someone else. Kids’ minds are like tiny sponges, so checking in on what you’re modeling, for them is vital. Be a role model by being respectful, understanding, and communicative.

4. Prioritize self-care.

What they say is true—you can’t take care of someone else if you don’t take care of yourself first. As parents, we often feel that there isn’t enough time in the day to get everything done. I can relate to this, believe me. I am willing to lose a bit of sleep to sub in a bubble bath, a walk around the neighborhood, or a few chapters of a book. Though I think getting extra sleep is an excellent form of self-care, I also believe that knowing yourself and what you need will make a huge difference in how you respond to your life. When I feel like I’ve had a small piece of time to be my own person, I find that I am a significantly more patient mother to my son. Find these little moments and make time for you. Leave those dirty dishes and unwashed laundry for tomorrow. Your kids aren’t going to look back and remember your “lived in” house; they’ll look back at how you interacted, as a family. When you’re losing your patience, give yourself permission to take a time out. If you take care of yourself, you’ll be able to take care of them even better. Now, that’s what they’ll remember.

5. Build your own support system.

The best way to be a support system for your child is to have your own support system. All parents deal with their own struggles, but many overlap and are relatable to another. Being a parent in the hard times can feel very stressful and alone. When we share what we’re going through with other parents, we hear their stories and can gain perspective and get our own issues off of our chests. Other parents can give us ideas on how to handle situations that we’re feeling unsure about and we can share our own insights with them. Building your own support system will give you perspective and help you feel less alone. 


Being a parent is hard and being a patient parent is even harder. By implementing these five tips, you will have a deeper understanding of how to be more patient with your children. We can all use these tips to be better versions of ourselves for our kids and model to them what patience, compassion and unconditional love look like.

Help in Instilling Self Confidence in Your Child by Savannah Slone

One of the most valuable traits a person can have is self-confidence. With that being said, parents ought to prioritize instilling it in their children. When children know their worth, they excel. They’re better able to focus on internal beauty, passions, goals, kindness and are happier individuals, overall. Below are five ways that you can begin planting seeds of healthy self-esteem in the minds of your kiddos today!

1. Lead by example.

While this is easier said than done, it needs to happen. If we want our children to feel comfortable in their own bodies, we should be sure to never put ourselves down in front of them. When we stand in front of the mirror and practice negative self-talk or call ourselves names for making a mistake, we’re teaching them that this is how you should see yourself, as well. We want them to love their bodies and learn from their mistakes through self-awareness, so we need to self-correct and exude what we want them to absorb. Lead by example and love yourself!

2. Build them up.

Remind your children how beautiful, smart, capable, strong and thoughtful they are. Tell them that they make you feel proud and that they fill you with joy. Compliment their accomplishments, big and small. By hearing your positive words, these will be the voices that will echo in their own self-talk. Build your kids up by letting them know how much they mean to you!

3. Encourage their passions.

Give your children opportunities to try out different hobbies, instruments, sports and more. Not only is this a lesson on following through with what you sign u p for, but it offers your child insights into what they do and don’t enjoy. Through completing classes or practices, they learn to give activities a chance, to participate fully and to not give up. Once they find their passions, nurture them! They’ll feel more connected and driven when they have something that they love to do. Encourage their passions and help them set goals within their commitments.

4. Encourage them to make their own decisions.

Though it is easy to map out your child’s life and activities, as their parents and guide, it is important to allow them to make their own choices. When children feel that sense of autonomy, they gain a sense of independence that will help them be respectable, liberated adults. When given the opportunity and encouragement to be their own individuals, they are required to develop problem-solving skills that they can’t fully grasp any other way. This doesn’t go for all areas of life, of course, but look for teachable moments and make use of them. Encourage your children to think for themselves and make their own decisions in life.

5. Teach them to be kind.

Teaching children to be empathetic, compassionate and kind makes for a leap in self-confidence. When we do for others, we feel more grounded in who we are. Better understanding what others are going through by being thoughtful and helpful will build friendships and decrease bullying. Kind children grow into kind adults—invest in the future of our world by teaching your kids the importance of practicing kindness.

A great way to make a habit of teaching your children about the practice of kindness is through Get it Going Now’s monthly kindness box. Each month, Get it Going Now subscribers receive a box which contains instructions, materials and cool souvenirs that result in a project to perform a good deed. By subscribing to Get it Going Now, you will feel inspired by your monthly opportunity to practice kindness.

Learn more about Get it Going Now here: https://www.getitgoingnow.com.

Let us know which of these self-confidence building tips made a difference in the comments section below.

 

 “Make Gratitude a Habit in Your Home” by Savannah Slone

Our lives get hectic and we get stressed. It happens to the best of us. We get sucked in and forget what is important in life. We move from one task to the next, without remembering to appreciate our lives and the people we care for. When we take the time to adopt more positive outlooks, our perspective shifts and we feel less weighed down. When we’re kind to others, they are uplifted and feel driven to pay kindness forward. Take a few minutes every so often to look around and notice what and whom you’re grateful for. Even the smallest details deserve to be appreciated. Say thank you like you mean it more often. This can be to your coworkers, your partner, your children, your barista, or the person who held the door open for you. Let those around you know that they are valued.

To make gratitude a habit in your home, spend time journaling about what you’re grateful for. Create daily lists of your privileges and opportunities, any small moments that made you smile, and people who made your day better than it would have been had they not been present. As you write in your journal, be sure to appreciate yourself, as well. Reflect on occasions where you made yourself proud or were kind. You deserve self-love and appreciation just as much as everyone else.

Another way to further incorporate gratitude into your family’s lifestyle, make a habit of discussing what you’re each grateful for over dinner. We don’t have to wait for Thanksgiving to show our appreciation. When I was a teenager, I attended summer camps that had gratitude circles in the yard before going in to eat each meal. We would take turns voluntarily stepping into the circle and naming what we want to express gratitude. Sometimes it would be to thank a fellow camper for being inclusive or helpful and other times it would be to thank the weather for being beautiful or the deer for strolling through and reminding us that this is their home, too. We’d show our gratefulness for the food we ate and the opportunity we had to attend the camp. With this being said, you don’t have to be at a camp that values gratitude to adopt this mindset. If you open yourself up and allow yourself to be aware of all of the good that naturally occurs in your everyday life, you will be positively affected. By making the mealtime routine of being grateful, as a family, you will all begin noticing more. You’ll want to be mindful so that you can have a mental list to report over the table that evening. This is an excellent practice for yourself, but will really benefit your children. By learning the importance of being a kind, mindful and thankful person, they will grow into adults equipped to change the world for the better.

The art of sending thank you cards is slowly dying out. My mother instilled this practice in me from an early age, after receiving gifts at birthday parties. Now, I like to send them to people who gift me with anything, whether it a physical item or a compliment or act of kindness that brightened my day. Sending and receiving letters is fun! To open up the mailbox and find a note informing them that they are appreciated can make their day, in return. Do good deeds for others and when they do good deeds for you, thank them with sincerity. What you put out into the world will come back to you.

When you’re giving and being kind, you will find gratitude in your heart for making someone else’s day better, as well. A great way to make a habit of being mindful and kind is through Get it Going Now’s monthly kindness box. Each month, Get it Going Now subscribers receive a box which contains instructions, materials and cool souvenirs that result in a project to perform a good deed. By subscribing to Get it Going Now, you will feel inspired by your monthly opportunity to practice kindness.

Learn more about Get it Going Now here: https://www.getitgoingnow.com

Doing Good Feels Good By Savannah Slone

We’re all in this life together and I think that we can all agree that we feel more contented when we feel supported. It feels better for everyone when we’re helping each other get through it. Everyone is undergoing their own personal struggles, so when we feel heard and understood, we feel less alone.

It’s undeniable--the happiest people are the kindest people. Regardless of race, gender, religion, class, or amount of available free time, we can all incorporate kindness into our everyday lives. When we do good for others, we feel better, ourselves. Begin improving your quality of life today by demonstrating kindness and compassion. When you set an example by doing good, you inspire other to do the same.

Good deeds come in an endless variety of possibilities. Doing good can be volunteering, being more inclusive, smiling at strangers, or complimenting people. It can also be calling a friend to ask how they’re doing, being available as a listener, offering to babysit for free, paying for the person’s coffee or food who is behind you in line, or opening the door for others. Other ideas include baking cookies for a person or organization in your community, sending thank you cards, taking an acquaintance or new community member to lunch, shoveling a neighbor’s driveway, and sending letters to soldiers and/or people in the hospital.

An example of one of my go-to acts of kindness is leaving notes of encouragement in random places. I begin by cutting and decorating scrapbook paper and adding quotations or simple affirmations. Among these quotes of encouragement have been, “You are enough”, “You are worth it”, “Love yourself”, “You are beautiful”, “Good things are coming”, and others of similar nature. When I have my inspirational notes prepared, I put them on top of neighbors’ mailboxes, on community bulletin boards, under car windshield wipers, inside of travel guide brochures, and any other places that I see fit, depending on where I am. For example, I found a lot more spaces for these notes while in Seattle, in comparison to the small town I live in. Make your own notes of encouragement and get to spreading unexpected bits of happiness. I first began doing this after I came across one of these notes and it made my day. I wanted to brighten the days of others, as well. 


Another great way to make a habit of practicing kindness is through Get it Going Now’s monthly kindness box. Each month, Get it Going Now subscribers receive a box which contains instructions, materials and cool souvenirs that result in a project to perform a good deed. By subscribing to Get it Going Now, you will feel inspired by your monthly opportunity to practice kindness.

Learn more about Get it Going Now here: https://www.getitgoingnow.com.

What acts of kindness have you recently practiced? Let us know in the comments section below.

Summer Camp Alternatives for Your Kids

While summer camp can be a highly enjoyable and memorable part of childhood, it isn’t always what’s best for every family. Whether the reasons are financial or otherwise, there are still many ways to make the most of your child’s summer break from school.

By exploring your community’s events and resources, you can plan out a summer equally as fun as any given summer camp. Libraries often host free readings, workshops and classes. National (and local) parks have educational opportunities for children, as well as adults. Your local YMCA and churches most likely have classes and activities for your child, as well. Browse online or in a local newspaper for volunteer opportunities at a local farm, one day workshops, child focused concerts, theatre in the park and so on. Swim lessons and play dates are excellent alternatives, too.

Summer camps are memorable because of their foundations in fun activities and socialization. By creating your own activities and keeping your social calendar full, you can easily make this summer one that your child will never forget.

For even more summer fun ideas, read our blog post titled, “15 Ways to Avoid Hearing “I’m Bored” This Summer” here :https://www.getitgoingnow.com/ourblog/2017/4/10/15-kind-ways-to-beat-the-boredom-blues-this-summer.

Your children can invite others to join them to these enjoyable events. By being inclusive, your child will make new friends, while simultaneously practicing kindness. A great way to make a habit of teaching your children about the practice of kindness is through Get it Going Now’s monthly kindness box. Each month, Get it Going Now subscribers receive a box which contains instructions, materials and cool souvenirs that result in a project to perform a good deed. By subscribing to Get it Going Now, you will feel inspired by your monthly opportunity to practice kindness.

Learn more about Get it Going Now here: https://www.getitgoingnow.com.

Let us know what your child’s favorite summer activity was in the comments section below.

15 Kind Ways to Beat “The Boredom Blues” This Summer

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Summer is quickly approaching, which means the kiddos are on break and ready to be entertained. When they’re so used to going, going, going, having time off inspires an endless stream of “I’m Bored”s. We have compiled a list of fun activities to do this summer, as a family.

1. Go on a hike. (smile at strangers!)

2. Prepare lunch and go out for a picnic. (surprise someone with their favorite snacks!)

3. Tie dye pillowcases. . . (and promote more peace!)

If this is an activity that your children will enjoy, here is a handy how to guide: http://plainvanillamom.com/2015/06/tie-dye-pillow-cases.html.

4. Create and eat homemade popsicles. (share them too!)

Here are some delicious homemade popsicle recipes: http://www.womansday.com/food-recipes/food-drinks/g1597/popsicle-recipes/.

5. Visit your local zoo. (give love to the animals)

6. Make a sundial. (get outside and get grounded)

Learn how to make your own sundial here: http://www.learnplayimagine.com/2014/05/how-to-make-sundial.html.

7. Have a water balloon fight. (well, just be nice!!)

8. Play the water balloon phonics game.
An alternative to the “have a water balloon fight” idea is to make it educational. You can read all about the water balloon phonics game here: http://www.messforless.net/water-balloon-phonics-get-ready-for-k/.

9. Visit your local library and spend the day reading. (or volunteer to read to others)

10. Play an outdoor game of Twister. (stretching and laughing in the sun always feels nice)

11. Paint like Jackson Pollock

For inspiration on this one, check out this link: http://www.happinessishomemade.net/homeschool-kids-art-lesson-jackson-pollock/.

12. Follow the life cycle of a butterfly. (and plant some pollenating plants!)

You can order a live butterfly kit here: https://www.amazon.com/Live-Butterfly-Kit-Caterpillars-Now-Hanging/dp/B00B7PNHBG.

13.  Grow flowers. (cut them and give them to someone)

14. Make your own sidewalk foam paint and decorate the driveway. (use kind words such as smile, love, hugs, and peace

Find out how to make your own sidewalk foam paint here: http://thetiptoefairy.com/2016/05/diy-sidewalk-foam-paint/.

15. Go on a camping trip. (spend time with family and friends)

All of the above listed activities can incorporate kindness. Your children can invite others to join them on adventures or teach a friend how to do one of their newfound activities. Their homegrown flowers, tie-dye pillowcases and homemade popsicles can all be shared with others, as well.

A great way to make a habit of teaching your children about the practice of kindness is through Get it Going Now’s monthly kindness box. Each month, Get it Going Now subscribers receive a box which contains instructions, materials and cool souvenirs that result in a project to perform a good deed. By subscribing to Get it Going Now, you will feel inspired by your monthly opportunity to practice kindness.

Learn more about Get it Going Now here: https://www.getitgoingnow.com.

Let us know what your child’s favorite summer activity was in the comments section below.

Ten Titles on Netflix That Teach Kids Kindness

Teaching kindness is an important aspect of raising compassionate children. One way of doing so is through witnessing others who are successfully practicing kindness. Below are ten Netflix titles that display kindness through friendship and standing up for what is right. Visit www.netflix.com to begin your first month free.

The Fox and the Hound

This film has profound messages of friendship and teaches the importance of appreciating the differences in those separate from our selves.

Mulan

This movie teaches children to never doubt or limit themselves.  The overarching theme of girl power brings an important gender expectation focus to the table, as well.

The Hunchback of Notre Dame

This movie teaches kids not to judge people by their appearance. This film encourages standing up for what’s right and wanting to brighten others’ lives.

E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial

This film is all about friendship and being selfless. It teaches children how rewarding it can be to be a helpful and giving person.

Zootopia

This film defines stereotypes and displays the negative side of playing a role in stereotyping others. It also inspires children to be kind and stand up for others.

Babe

This movie exhibits the difference between right and wrong and the prominence of resistance. Themes of friendship, compassion and more have a large presence in the film, as well. 

Finding Dory

This movie focuses on differences and disabilities. By increasing awareness and empathy, children are more likely to understand and accept and be inclusive toward the peers that they don’t have too many similarities with.

Home

This movie concentrates on diversity and why it ought to be valued.

Kindness is Contagious

The title of this film gives away the importance of viewing it. This movie played a huge role in the inspiration of this list. 

Bully

This is a film that we would suggest showing to your older kids, as it is rated PG-13 and handles sensitive, emotional subjects. It is a very moving, important film, but we suggest that you pre-screen it yourself before you decide whether or not it is age appropriate for your child to view.

To bring the teaching of kindness into your movie night, you can conclude the night by discussing the global themes and lessons learned from watching each feature.

A great way to make a habit of practicing kindness is through Get it Going Now’s monthly kindness box. Each month, Get it Going Now subscribers receive a box which contains instructions, materials and cool souvenirs that result in a project to perform a good deed. By subscribing to Get it Going Now, you will feel inspired by your monthly opportunity to practice kindness.

Learn more about Get it Going Now here: https://www.getitgoingnow.com.

Let us know what your child took away from these Netflix titles in the comments section below.